Snooping Act

January 28th, 2009 by Timo Vuorensola

ukkeli.jpgThe “Urkintalaki“-thing we have also been involved in few ways seems to have reached its goal of about 10000€ to buy the infomercial that’s going to be aired on TV nationwide next week. “Urkintalaki” – or “Snooping Act” is a law that’s about to be pushed through in Finnish government, that would allow not only companies to keep an eye on emails of the employees, but also other public organizations, like housing cooperatives etc. to do the same. That’s giving a nice kick in the nuts for the constitutional law back here in Finland, making the Land of Thousand Lakes one inch worse place to live in.

A group of Internet activists decided to do what they can, and inform as many people as possible about the legistlative proposal. I’ve seen the rough versions of the infomercials, and they are damn cool! We’ll show ‘em here as soon as they are on the Internet. Check out the Urkintalaki website for more info – in Finnish only, sorry :(

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5 Responses to “Snooping Act”

  1. As far as I know (and I certainly hope I’d know…) this is something that has never been done before in Finland. It has been only recently that people have started to actively voice their opinion on laws.

    It is very interesting to see how this goes and how people will react. Not only is seeing a political commercial somethig new – but the Lex Nokia ads are rather provocative. Personally, I think they are really good but I think people will be taken by suprise seeing them on tv…

  2. [...] blatant-infringement-of-privacy bill about to be hammered through the Finnish legislative system that we recently blogged about has, as of this morning 8 P.M. local, done the impossible: produced a TV infomercial mostly on a [...]

  3. [...] blogeissa: Burger’s Notes Piraattipuolue Beyond the Iron Sky Urkintalaki-blogi Paavo Arhinmäen [...]

  4. Miss84 says:

    The massive popularity of pulp magazines in the 1930s and 1940s increased interest in mystery fiction. ,

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